New Coronavirus Vaccine Requires ‘Trust’ of African American Community

Dr. Kevin Williams

Stacy M. Brown NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

News that Pfizer and BioNTech’s announcement that their coronavirus vaccine was more than 90 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 among those without previous infection arrives as the United States continues to realize record-breaking new cases.

For the first time on Thursday, November 12, the country surpassed 150,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day.

The total number of cases soared past 10.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Both California and Texas have recorded more than 1 million total cases, while states like Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey have seen significant rises in COVID infections.

The most recent available statistics show that the District of Columbia has more than 18,500 total positive cases and 657 deaths.

Washington, DC health officials have administered nearly 572,000 COVID tests to roughly 272,000 residents.

More than 242,000 people have died in the United States since the declaration of the outbreak of the pandemic in March. Health officials have expressed that the new vaccine offers real hope for the future.

“It is a great day for science and humanity. The first set of results from our Phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial provides the initial evidence of our vaccine’s ability to prevent COVID-19,” Dr. Albert Bourla, Pfizer Chairman and CEO, offered in a news release.

“We are reaching this critical milestone in our vaccine development program at a time when the world needs it most, with infection rates setting new records, hospitals nearing over-capacity, and economies struggling to reopen,” Dr. Bourla remarked.

Pfizer has maintained a strategic partnership with the National Newspaper Publishers Association, offering insight on various rare diseases like sickle cell that disproportionately affect the African American community.

Dr. Kevin Williams, the Chief Medical Officer for Pfizer’s Rare Disease unit, periodically writes a column in the Black Press to help keep the African American community informed.

According to information posted on the CDC’s website, clinical development is a three-phase process.

During Phase I, small groups of people receive the trial vaccine.

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